Serve Well Blog

Entries tagged 'Arts & Culture'

9.7.17

Holding Together through Art

The Krista Foundation | Colleague Press, Krista Foundation Press, Preparing To Serve, Sustaining Service, Arts & Culture, Post-Service Term Reflections

For our second annual art e-news, we asked Krista colleagues to riff on our conference theme, "Holding Together". Read on to see and hear how Spencer, Chasity, Richard, Linda and Doug captured holding together in the face of difference. For larger images, see slideshow at the bottom of this post.

Spencer Uemura, 2016 Krista Colleague, "Migrations"

 

Chasity Jones, 2017 Krista Colleague, "Black Infinity"

Submission
Embarrassment
Tongue Tied
Guilty
Obey Authority
Stay out of the way
Disposable
Ignored
Made an example out of
A Mascot
A token
Frustrated
Don't be caught taking a break or you will determine the work ethic of all people who look like you. So instead, I work myself to death.
Smile, even if you're tired
Pretend to be interested in everything all the time.
Survival is brutal- these lessons are vital.
I can never acknowledge the pain that threatens my life.
No permission to speak truth. Truth invalidated in every way possible- but so subtle.
Will my truth get me fired? Will my truth cancel all of these wonderful opportunities?
Have I obtained these opportunities because I am well trained in the art of relating to and pleasing the white faces that surround me.
They tell me I'm different- than the black people they've known previously.
This cuts me like a knife as I remember- I am no different because my people and I are ONE.

I am told speaking white is a gift.
But I miss everything that was stripped in order to maintain this pale skin face lift.
I've been brain washed, emotions repressed- colonized; my psyche occupied.
Because of this, I've separated myself from the people who sustain me,
From the mothers and fathers who raised me,
From the people who embody divinity....
No longer afraid of darkness, like America's taught me.
So I embrace the black infinity- which is the Alpha and the Omega.
I am an individual and stand with a community that the most descriptive words cannot describe its beauty and wonder.....
I often wonder how many shades of black and brown exist.
My heart is full as we together resist and RECLAIM all that was stolen
To my people, I am beholding
So I exist.....in this space as a testimony with no limits
Aware that every breath is an act of resistance.

 

Richard Murray, 2015 Krista Colleague, "Migrations"

The act of assemblage holds together disparate objects, creating new meanings. In the same way, I am holding together memories, ideas, people, and moments as layered lenses to create new perspectives.

This specific piece asks the question, "What is the potential for architecture to...?" I am on a journey to search for the remaining pieces to this question-

...create spaces for understanding
...foster community ownership
...empower communities of color

 

 

Linda Chastine, 2016 Krista Colleague

Dear Self,

You will learn that home is not a country or a city.

It does not lie between soiled sheets, where youthful giggles rise and inside jokes are created.

You will learn that it is not an innate feeling and does not necessarily deal in familiarity.
?
Home is not in the motherland. with the people that hold the skin tone of your kin.

Home does not reside in the place where fear was taught and your heart first broke.

You will learn that home is not another person. Your search cannot be found in nostalgia or recovered in replayed images and regrets.

Again.

Home is not a place.

Home is not a person.

Home is not your momma, baby brother, or grandma.

It's not your college town.

It is not your bed after a long day of surviving.

Home is you.

There's nothing profound, yet something so magical about that discovery.

Hold onto it.

When your home feels like a prison, revisit this lesson.

When home is something like a dry and barren land, write it letters. Let it know that you miss its comforts. and probably haven't shown it all the love it needs, but you're trying.

Cook it dinners that make it sleepy, feed it food that gives it energy.

Let it sweat it out when the pressure gets so much that it wants to leave its frame.

Redecorate it.

Show pride in it.

Boast about it.

Take a tour every once in a while. You might discover somethings you didn't notice.

You might find something that you forgot was there.

Listen.

Stop looking.

know that home is not a place or a person. but home is.

you.

 

Doug Orofino, 2012 Krista Colleague, "Envíame a Mí"

Listen Here

7.26.17

A Decade Later: Your Whole Self Comes Home

The Krista Foundation | Colleague Press, Urban America, Arts & Culture, Integrating Service As A Way Of Life

How to interpret "holding together" through worship and music at the 2017 conference? Maren Haynes Marchesini '07 chose the three-part song "Standing Stone". Chanting together I will be your standing stone/I will stand by you powerfully embodied differences held as a whole.
 
The PhD Candidate in Ethnomusicology is exploring holding together in her home state of Montana, where she and husband Michael '07 moved after years away. "You don't really go home again," she says. "You bring your whole self and all your experiences when you move back, and see everything differently." Drawing on what she learned about immigrant justice at the worker-run Day Labor Center in Tucson, her training in multicultural music, and her time as a church music director, she looks at Helena through the lens of race, class, gender, and community. Talking with neighbors and relatives, "I am opening up that part of myself that recognizes that we have a lot of values in common, in spite of starting on different sides."
 
As one of Helena's only ethnomusicologists, she has been enthusiastically invited to share her gifts in the symphony, schools, and college, and will relaunch the city's Children's Chorus in partnership with a local arts organization. She hopes the chorus will nurture kids' curiosity for music, people, and traditions from around the world. "In a place as culturally white as Montana, that would be a huge thing."

 

10.28.16

Art in Service

The Krista Foundation | Krista Foundation Press, Preparing To Serve, Sustaining Service, Arts & Culture

For our ENews this month, we are trying something new - in an effort to celebrate the gifts of Krista Foundation community members who are visual: an art e-news. We hope you will find inspiration from the Colleagues who submitted their art work in response to the question: 

How has art played a role in service? How has it inspired you? 

Some Colleagues submitted reflections with their art, which we are sharing with you here. 

For larger images, see slideshow at the bottom of this post. 

 

Spencer Uemura, 2016 Krista Colleague

Photography has helped me grow a gentle observance as I go through my service among people that are very different than me in many ways, but also similar in others. By taking pictures of moments, I captured memories for myself that I can revisit fondly now that I've left the expanse of the Great Plains of Montana and the misty reaches of the North Cascades on Washington. My photos allow me to show others and bring them into the story, to invite them into my personal journey and development. And sometimes, in the words of a fictitious and elusive photographer in The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, "If I like a moment, for me, personally, I don't like to have the distraction of the camera. I just want to stay in it." In an odd way, as I've learned about photography I've also discovered when it's important to see a view beyond the lens and simply be

 

Theresa Cutter, 2012 Krista Colleague

 

"Bread of Life"

Attached is a collage I created two years ago on a retreat while in service themed, "bread of life." Creating the collage allowed me to slow down and reflect on the meaning of giving life to the world, which in turn I took to mean serving with joy, planting love. It depicts a woman of color as the presence of God, as opposed to the traditional white, male, breathing "ruach" (Hebrew for spirit/breath) into "la pan de vida" (Spanish for "the bread of life").

 

Doug Orofino, 2012 Krista Colleague

I used my grant to purchase recording equipment in order to create a CD of the Mass songs sung by the children of the Nuestros Pequeños Hermanos (NPH) Honduras home. Listen to one of our songs here!

 

Anthony DeLorenzo, 2008 Krista Colleague

Carnival Parade in Surakarta on the Island of Java (Indonesia)

 

Joe Tobiason, 2009 Krista Colleague

Summer sunrise
Artist Point at Mt Baker, WA
August 2016

To see more of Joe's photography, visit here: https://jtobiason.com/

 

Allie May Jones, 2008 Krista Colleague


"My motivation and inspiration for creating art has always been to do it for other people, which to me is the heart of service. I see a problem, and I see a solution I can offer in the form of a drawing, or a design. Whether I'm helping a new business owner create a logo, or designing an annual report for a non-profit without a huge budget. I feel blessed to be equipped with this skill to turnaround and help others with it in a very practical way. In addition to graphic design, the other thing I love to do with art is make people smile (which is also at the heart of service!). This logo is an example of a quick illustration style I do for people, usually on cards or in letters. I use the sketches to put people in fun or clever situations (this is also fun to do using Photoshop of course, lol...)."

 

To see more of Allie's work, visit here: http://allimaydesign.com/

 

 

 

 

8.4.15

Krista Foundation Expands Toolkit

The Krista Foundation | Colleague Press, Service Ethics, Arts & Culture

"I will take care of myself and also challenge myself as much as I feel comfortable...I am a creative and artistic being...I give myself permission to have fun." As the group of thirty-some trainees declared these and other group norms, we all used our hands and arms to embody the messages, ending with a fun, little boogie.

This group, including four Krista Colleagues (Claire Smith '12, Kara King ‘06, Karolina Wright-Williams, ‘01, and Angie Merrill, '05), gathered together in Fremont for three full days of questions, creativity, reflection, and skills-building with First Aid Arts. The training centered on the Healing Arts Toolkit (HAT)- a box with an abundance of art supplies and facilitator resources - and encouraged participants to reflect deeply upon trauma-informed care, engage in arts-based therapeutic activities, design culturally appropriate adaptations, and practice self-care in a variety of settings.

First Aid Arts Healing Arts Toolkit

 Krista Colleagues (from left): Angie Merrill '05, Karolina Wright-Williams '01, Claire Smith '12, and Kara King '06


Some of the thoughts shared by the Colleagues that attended:

Why did you want to participate in this training? What goals or hopes did you bring with you?
I wanted to participate in the First Aid Arts HAT Training because the more I work with clients who have experienced trauma, the more I recognize how much we carry that trauma in our bodies and how it is not always accessible verbally. I believe art, in all forms, is a powerful modality for healing and I want to learn more as a therapist in how to use these tools with my clients.
~ Karolina Wright-Williams

I came into this training for myself and for the Krista Foundation. I, personally, wanted to build some arts-based healing skills to (hopefully) use in a future, as-yet-unknown job, and I also wanted to bring the skills into the KFGC. Many Colleagues could use these resources in their service and work, so I wanted to make the toolkit and knowledge available. Also, I think that, in their lives of service leadership, Colleagues need to tend our resilience and heal from traumas (both direct and vicarious) that we have experienced. As the Service Ethics coordinator on the Colleague Council, I approached the training as a tool to share so that we can all serve well. ~Claire Smith

Claire Smith First Aid Arts Toolkit
Claire Smith '12

 


What did you appreciate about it? Highlights? Challenges?

I appreciated the focus on the training objectives - Emotion regulation, Self-awareness, and Interpersonal skills - and the time taken to reflect on how they are being achieved in each activity.
~ Angie Merrill

Part of the training was learning to find and use the "lowest level of creative risk" to begin our activities, thus giving more people the ability to engage. In my work with young adults who have suffered complex trauma, this facilitation technique is going to be so helpful. It gives access to people who may otherwise disengage (for many motives) a door into the activity. Because we not only learned about the activities, but participated in them, I was able to have this experience myself - and that lowest level of risk allowed me to take deeper risks as we moved further into the training.
~Kara King

2015 First Aid Arts drawings        First Aid Arts Workshop

What "take aways" did you gather? Skills? Moments? Ideas? Insights?
Something we did in the workshop was to shout out, "Arugula!" when a mistake was made, and this was an experiential reminder to celebrate failure as a community and to normalize mistakes. Part of my work is loving our kids and caring for them during the day, so I hope to translate this idea and to create a word for our family to use, both as a way to teach our kids this concept and to remind us as parents to model that.
~Karolina Wright-Williams

I was reminded, again, of the importance of choice for survivors of trauma. Choice is embedded in the Toolkit activities, and I am reminded to be intentional in offering choice as we move through these activities which can bring up so much for survivors.
~Kara King

What does Resilience mean to you? Why does it matter?
I see resilience as both the capacity to endure/survive and the ability to return to a place of stability. I think of a line from Jane Hirschfield's poem, "...the sinuous tenacity of a tree: finding the light newly blocked on one side, it turns in another." Resiliency is not an easy road and often involves pain and working through the hard stuff.
~Karolina Wright-Williams

I think of resilience as the miraculous ability that humans have to recuperate and regain balance in the midst of crisis. I believe we all have it throughout our lives, and it can be tended with self-care and community support. It matters for individuals and communities because it keeps us from breaking under the weight of the world, and it matters for organizations because it is a reminder to honor the strength and spirit of those being served, and to conduct service in a way the supports the rebuilding of self instead of re-traumatizing.
~Claire Smith

The Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship now has a First Aid Arts toolkit, which we will be incorporating into events for Colleagues and checking out to Colleagues with prior therapy training.

 

Keep an eye out for more resilience, trauma-informed care, arts-based healing, and trainings coordinated by KFGC's Service Ethics team

1.30.15

Nominate a Krista Colleague

The Krista Foundation | Krista Foundation Press, Developing Nations, Environmental Projects, Urban America, Law, Microenterprise, Poverty: Urban US & International, Preparing To Serve, Arts & Culture, Business, Community, Economic Justice, Education, Environment, Faith/Theological Exploration, Global Citizenship, Healthcare, Homelessness, Intercultural Development, Peace & Reconciliation, Poverty: Urban US & International, Preparing To Serve

The Krista Colleague Cohort Program is the heart of the Krista Foundation. Nominated by community leaders, 17 young adult Krista Colleagues are selected each year. Colleagues are committed to a sustained period of voluntary or vocational service of at least nine months and motivated to serve by their Christian faith. The Foundation community journeys alongside Colleagues before, during and after service, empowering them to transform service experience into lives of service leadership.

Acceptance as a Colleague includes a $1,000 Service & Leadership Grant to be used at the intersection of vocational interests and commitment to serve. The Foundation pays for four years of the Krista Foundation annual Service Leadership conference and debriefing retreat. Additionally, each Colleague commits to serving as a peer mentor with future Krista Colleagues, developing global citizenship through leadership in retreats and conferences. 

Nominations are due by March 20th, so nominate today!

Click here for nomination criteria or to complete the online nomination forms!

Questions? Please contact Program Director, Stacy Kitahata

Please LIKE, POST, and SHARE this link with any potential nominators.

-The Krista Foundation

2.26.14

Little Things Console Us Because Little Things Afflict Us
by Nikkita Oliver - Krista Colleague

The Krista Foundation | Colleague Press, Urban America, Intercultural Development, Law, Arts & Culture, Community, Education, Global Citizenship, Integrating Service As A Way Of Life, Intercultural Development, Post-Service Term Reflections, Sustaining Service

Little things console us because little things afflict us.
- Pascal

 

I recently attended the "RACE: Are We So Different?" exhibit at the Seattle Center as part of a Krista Foundation outing with the Krista Colleague community. Once inside, I found myself at a unique display including a binder full of notecards where many visitors expressed both contempt and reverence for sports mascots.

A number of the commenters self-identified as Native, illuminating the trauma and harm that sports mascots inflict on them, their tribes, and communities. Juxtaposed to these heartfelt truths were the thoughts of those who see no problem with the manner in which sports teams have co-opted Native cultural images and in many instances commercialized the most stereotypical Native images. As if the dialogue were not complex enough, there were those who self-identified as Native who took no issue with the mascots and maybe even saw other issues as more concerning.

One comment stood out vividly. A member of the Tlingit tribe described what they believed to be the gravest issues facing Native communities. They discussed the life expectancy of Native males and the drop-out rate of Native teens, stating, "These issues are far more important than sports team mascots." To many, Native mascots do not seem like a big issue, but often it is the things that seem the smallest that have the greatest impact.

As a brown person in the white institution of law I constantly deal with small nuanced forms of racism that exist because of larger ones. The larger ones will continue to exist because we are afraid and/or unwilling to deal with the smaller forms of racism.

There is an overall acceptance of the co-optation of cultural assets in the United States with disregard for the impact on communities and people. Additionally, rarely do the owners and creators of those cultural assets receive any sort of recognition or payment for the use of their image even when the image is being used for profit. This process further contributes to the damage done to a community or cultural groups psyche and continues to propel a negative and oppressive relationship between the "minority" and the "majority"1.

While some non-Native people may not see the problem, and may even point to to those Native people who take no issue with it to legitimate their own point of view, the reality is there are Native peoples who are offended by the use of their cultural assets as mascots. When considering racial and ethnic concerns that may seem minute, it is important to remember that big things are often made of smaller things. A small cut can very easily become an infection and a small change can be the catalyst needed to spark a big change.

Dr. John M. Perkins speaks of these little things in his work. When I was in college I sat in a room of young leaders at Seattle Pacific University eager to make change in the world. He told us the key to community development is understanding that the most obvious problems are often symptoms of a larger underlying illness. He told us, "rarely is the solution to the most obvious struggle the root cause of the problem". He encouraged us to consider the small and often times overlooked concerns, especially if those are the concerns the community is point us towards.

He then shared with us this story:

A team of community developers arrived in a neighborhood. They interviewed the people, did research and prepared a list of things they believed the community needed to solve. This list had hundreds of items ranked from the most important to the least. The community members' response to the community developers was that the rat problem was the most important issue to address. The rat problem was ranked in the lowest portion of the list the developers created. Despite their own ideas, the community developers listened to the neighborhood and addressed the rat problem first. As the rats disappeared so did most of the list.

Dr. Perkins shared this story to remind us of two key principles in community development: The small things matter and a community knows itself better than an outside community developer.

At the University of Washington Law School, I listen to people daily discuss our systems and struggles - rarely reflecting on their own role in a problematic system. They hardly ever consider the importance and value of community voice and in particular those communities that are marginalized and disenfranchised. In these spaces there are few people of color, and like those who shared their opinions in the binder at the race exhibit, we do not always agree on the solution. This often becomes a tool of division, co-optation, and/or further marginalization of those voices who speak in opposition to the majority opinion.

Listening is of the utmost importance in addressing any and every situation. If we do not first listen, we will not know how to act in ways that promote wholeness and reconciliation. Too often in U.S. culture do we rely on our formal education (and our privilege) as clout for why we should lead or be in charge. We are not very good at following those who have less formal education, though the community members have far more experience and knowledge regarding their community.

Mascots may seem like a small issue, but when we consider our generational memories of historic racial violence and present afflictions we can see that the psyches of people of color (and white people) have been damaged by big things sustained by small consistent actions and inactions. This small act is the continued poking and prodding on a large wound and emblematic of how we often devalue other people and their cultures. Mascots may not seem like a big deal in light of drop-out rates and mass incarceration, but they are small piece of the puzzle in addressing the root causes of both individual and institutional racism. Our willingness and humility to eliminate the "small" things are a way we show our love and respect for humanity and lead us towards addressing the "larger" struggles.

I believe that we would better serve each other and society if we learned to see multiple solutions, no matter how big or small, as viable and equally necessary; to address the mascots, drop-out rates and mass incarceration all at once.

The work of reconciliation is not easy and often happens in the least obvious places. Reconciliation, like a journey, happens one step at time; sometimes in small steps and sometimes in large strides. We often do not know the value of our small steps, but without them we would not have made it through the journey. Listening and acting on the small things makes the big changes possible.

 

1 The use of quotations around "majority" and "minority" is to signify an important nuance in the use of these terms. It is not to say one group is more major and the other more minor, but in this instance referring to specifically numbers or the size of the population of people. The majority being the larger quantitative group and minority being a smaller quantitative group. In the United States the use of these terms in this manner is appropriate, but in a place like South Africa, where the minority (Dutch/white South Africans) were in power and the majority (Native/black South Africans) were not, these terms must be used differently. 

4.20.12

Service Leadership Update- A Voice for Justice

The Krista Foundation | Colleague Press, Urban America, Arts & Culture, Community, Education, Faith/Theological Exploration, Poverty: Urban US & International, Sustaining Service

nikkita oliver, photo by Contina Kemp"Justice, like people, has living impact" writes Nikkita Oliver ('08), who currently teaches poetry, debate and biblical leadership, and runs the chapel program at the Seattle Urban Academy (SUA). Serving for two years as a chaplain and service provider at the King County Youth Detention Center, Nikkita accompanied youth struggling in the system, and listened to their stories. "...The law should work to the benefit of the people,"writes Nikkita, "In my experience, I have not seen the law work as such." These troubling encounters have strengthened her resolve to bring legal literacy and empowerment to her south Seattle community.

 

Colleagues Nikkita Oliver '08 and Laura Wright '11She has a track record of developing community youth. An active musician and spoken word artist, Nikkita facilitates community spaces for youth to give voice to their world. A member of the 2011 KF Conference planning team, also she used her artistic gifts to lead the worship service. This month, Nikkita received the exciting news that she earned a full scholarship to attend the University of Washington Law School. The KF community celebrates Nikkita as she takes the next step on her journey of service leadership.

3.13.12

Faith and Other Flat Tires | Author Reading 3.31.12

The Krista Foundation | Krista Foundation Press, Arts & Culture, Community, Faith/Theological Exploration

book cover: faith and other flat tiresEvent Announcement:

The Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship is pleased to invite you to a special author reading and signing. Andrea Palpant Dilley is the sister of Krista Colleague Nathan Palpant, and a long-time friend of the Foundation. We anticipate a lively and meaningful evening of connection and dialogue.

Faith and Other Flat Tires:

Saturday, March 31, 7:00 p.m.
The Green Bean Café
8533 Greenwood Avenue North, Seattle, WA 98103
Visit andreapalpantdilley.com for more information.

In her deeply personal memoir, Andrea navigates the doubts that plague believers and skeptics alike: Why does God allow suffering? Why is God so silent, distant, and uninvolved? And why does church seem so dysfunctional?

Yet amid her skepticism, she begins to ask new questions: Could doubting be a form of faith? Might our doubts be a longing for God that leads to a faith we can ultimately live with?

andrea palpant dilleyAbout Andrea: Andrea grew up in Kenya as the daughter of Quaker missionaries and spent the rest of her childhood in the Pacific Northwest. She studied English literature and writing at Whitworth University. Her work as a writer has appeared in Rock and Sling, Geez, and Utne Reader, as well as the anthology Jesus Girls: True Tales of Growing up Female and Evangelical. Her work as a documentary producer has aired nationally on American Public Television. She lives with her husband and daughter in Austin, Texas.

"Andrea tells her story without becoming indulgent as a victim or preachy as the victor . . . It is so carefully and seamlessly crafted that, though I began the book thinking about her story, I ended up thinking about my own . . . Her ability to reflect on the past, to find meaning, and to see grace in people and events that seemed anything but gracious is what won me over. I suspect it will win you over too."
-Jerry Sittser

Related Documents

Acrobat (PDF) Document

Faith and Other Flat Tires
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1.26.11

Greetings!

The Krista Foundation | Service In The News, Developing Nations, Environmental Projects, Urban America, Arts & Culture, Community, Education, Global Citizenship, Intercultural Development

serve well blogNo. Seriously. Greetings!

Have you noticed the world is full of thousands of spoken and unspoken ways to meet, greet, or just acknowledge someone?
In intercultural service assignments, whether in U.S. neighborhoods or international settings, we adapt to local ways of meeting somebody, entering a room, or just passing a stranger.

Watch this video prepared by 09 Colleague Brandon Adams, and be sure to post your short paragraph response below:

 

Here's some quick food for thought from Sean Rawson, a volunteer with Jesuit Volunteers International:

"Nicaraguans almost always greet everyone in a room upon entering, either individually or collectively as a group. This usually means a handshake or a cheek kiss for old friends or new acquaintances alike. Even if somebody enters a conversation or a meeting, he or she generally interjects at least a "Buenas tardes" to those present. To my North American-educated mind, this initially came off as extremely rude; I'd be having a conversation or even presenting some point in a workshop, and someone would walk in late with a public "Buenas!" distracting me and the rest of the group from whatever was being discussed. As time went on during my first few months here, I began to realize that this wasn't just a group of inconsiderate youth, but in fact a great example of the beauty of cultural diversity.

Anyhow, I've been working on learning from my Nicaraguan co-workers, friends and acquaintances to recognize that human relationships are worth taking a few seconds out of a busy schedule to make someone feel recognized."

How about you? Share a custom or a story about the greetings you've learned or observed in service.

(Comments may not post immediately, as they'll go through a moderator to prevent spam.)

 

 

10.26.10

GCJ v5 Photo Contest

Destiny Williams | Krista Foundation Press, Arts & Culture, Global Citizenship

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

Photo Contest WinnerThe Krista Foundation is thrilled to announce the completion of Volume 5 of The Global Citizen: A Journal for Young Adults Engaging the World through Service.

This is our 10-Year Celebration Edition: a compilation of new and 'best-of' articles, combined with curricular questions for individual and small group/class reflection.
Staff, Colleagues, and Foundation Friends invested many hours producing this journal, and we truly believe it's worth reading and sharing!

With the Journal's Release, we want to thank ALL of you who submitted images for the
COVER ART PHOTO CONTEST... and most importantly unveil the WINNERS!

PLEASE CLICK HERE to view the winning photos & description/explanations.

The themes included: Joy Dance, US Urban Beauty, Global Beauty, Bridge Crossing. 
Congratulations Joe, Brandon, Chris, and Abdul!

Click to view the winners!